Legal Defense for Your Future
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Federal Appeals Court Reverses State Supreme Court on IAC Claim

The sentencing phase in a criminal case is an important opportunity for an attorney to present mitigating evidence on his client’s behalf to argue for a lesser sentence. Evidence of a client’s upbringing and traumatic childhood, for example, are important mitigating factors for the court to consider in deciding an appropriate sentence.

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Employment & Security Clearances

Thousands of people who work and live throughout Virginia have a criminal record. Though there are some federal and state-wide legal protections, a criminal record still matters if you want to be employed in Virginia. It doesn't matter if you are applying for some positions, but a criminal record may play a pivotal role in many other positions.

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Criminal Convictions & Professional Licenses

A criminal conviction isn't just a matter of having a criminal record that pops up whenever a background check is conducted – quite possibly for the rest of your life – it is also about the quality of life you can live after you have paid your debt to society. Regardless of whether you are actually guilty or not, a conviction can cause irreparable harm.

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Criminal Record Impact on Family Matters

A criminal record can affect a person's life in many ways. We know this to be particularly true when it comes to job searches and housing. But it can affect family life as well. The ways it can affect family life are both direct and indirect. That's why, in part, Bryan Jones works hard to put forth the best defense for his clients.

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Obstruction of Justice

What Is Obstruction of Justice? Obstruction of justice is a crime in Virginia. The most commonly charged version of Obstruction of justice requires the prosecutor to prove: that someone knowingly attempted to impede a law enforcement officer, By threats or force, or in the lawful performance of his duties.

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Disorderly Conduct

What Is Disorderly Conduct? The most common version of disorderly conduct requires the prosecutor prove that a person engaged in conduct in any street, highway, public building, or public place having a direct tendency to cause acts of violence by the person a whom such conduct is directed

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Underage Possession of Alcohol

In Virginia, if you're charged with underage possession of alcohol, you may be eligible to have the charge dismissed. Virginia has a first offender program that allows a charge of underage possession of alcohol to be dismissed if you complete alcohol counseling and community service.

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Public Intoxication

Va. Code § 18.2-388 makes it a crime to appear in public while intoxicated. The actual language from the statute is: If any person ... is intoxicated in public, whether such intoxication results from alcohol, narcotic drug or other intoxicant or drug of whatever nature, he shall be deemed guilty of a Class 4 misdemeanor.

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Virginia Drug Possession and Distribution Offenses

Virginia law makes it illegal to possess or distribute a controlled substance without a valid prescription. Common drugs classified as a controlled substance include heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine (“meth”), ecstasy, and prescription pills such as oxycodone. Illegal possession of these drugs is a serious felony. The circumstances under which a person can be charged varies greatly.

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Spousal Privilege in Domestic Cases in Virginia

In domestic cases when the police are called and a spouse is charged with a crime, such as domestic assault, one of the most common questions of the accused is whether their spouse can testify against them. This question arises out of what many people understand as spousal privilege, also known as marital privilege and husband-wife privilege.

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